Monthly Archives: March 2012

Pro-GMO Activity Book For Kids

Monsanto has partnered with a handful of other companies who want to control every thing that grows to publish a new activity book for children.

Here’s a little excerpt….

“You will see that biotechnology is being used to figure out how to: 1) grow more food; 2) help the environment; and 3) grow more nutritious food that improves our health.”

Of course here’s how it should really read…

“You will see that biotechnology is being used to figure out how to: 1) control all seeds; 2) spray every inch of the planet with chemicals; and 3) crossbreed fish genes with tomatoes so they can be picked by slave labor when they’re green, be driven hundreds of miles and still be able to sit in the grocery store produce section for as long as possible.”

Biotechnology Activity Book for Kids

Episode 25: Downsides of Real Food

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There are some challenges to eating real food versus those highly-processed, prepackaged, industrialized edible widgets. We discuss some of them in this episode. We also offer a great tip on helping kids transition to eating healthier food.

Video of girl’s potato experiment

They may look like little ladybugs, but they’re actually baby stink bugs!


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What’s different

with this blog? I remember last year at this time, I was able to take pictures and post, and find links and and and so many things, but this year what’s my problem?

Last year I worked 11a-8p. I would drop Madigan off at school and then come home cook and clean and blog and take pictures. Now I work 8a-430p so I get up get myself ready for work, get the daughter ready for school, make lunches for each of us, drop off at said school and head to work. When I come home it’s time to catch up on the day, make sure homework is done, watch the news, do some light cleaning (very light if you have ever been to my house) and start working on dinner. After dinner, clean up (honestly just put dishes in sink and wait for the dish fairy to arrive) read, talk with husband, talk with Madigan, maybe play a game or something then get ready for bed.

I will attempt to be better at posting, I might enlist someone else in the house to help me. Expect a podcast tomorrow.

Look what’s growing

We planted beans earlier this week and some of them have sprouted.

And our superstars from last year, the cherry tomatoes have started sprouting!

Here’s our spinach and lettuce.

Let the growing begin

Look who’s excited to start planting?!

We started some spinach and lettuce last week and we already have a few sprouts.

We also started the tomatoes, beans and peppers. We have great weather this week, temperatures in the 70s.

Hambone hambone

I consider myself an expert on only two things, my daughter and ham. If I haven’t mentioned it I have two tattoos that are about ham, ham is a family tradition and a food highlight. I have to say it again, I LOVE HAM. The ham I have eaten over my last 40 years have always been Simthfield or some other store bought salt cured ham. Now is the true test of how committed I am to the local food movement. I have been unable to find a locally raised cured traditional ham. Boomer and I have talked about doing a brine or buying a smoker to get the cut of pork that would be ham to become ham. We have also talked about getting our taste buds trained to not think of ham as only the salty ham from the factory farms.

Last night I made a ham steak with the glaze I use for my traditional ham. It was good, not the same, but good. One big difference I noticed was the size and shape of the ham bone.

It was more dense and not that circle shape. I put the fork there so you could have a point of reference. That’s a big dinner fork. I am not a butcher so I couldn’t tell you the placement of the cut on the leg, but this is a very different looking ham bone than any I have seen in the ham steak department.

Let the planting begin

We had a 70 degree day. So when I got home from work Madigan and I got outside to get the patio fixed up to start planting.

We moved, swept and stacked what’s out there. As the plants come in we adjust.

We started Spinach and Lettuce.